What Every Man Needs to Know About Penis Cancer

Everyone knows the joke: Tell Doctor Google about a variety of symptoms and the answer will always be ‘cancer.’ That’s part of the reason so many men wonder if any penis problem might actually be an early sign of penis cancer. But it’s important to remember that good penis care is not just about taking care of physical needs, but emotional and mental ones as well. Understanding the signs of penis cancer can help ease a guy’s mind when things are benign – but can also provide them with the incentive they need to get to the doctor fast if things don’t look right.

Knowing the signs of penis cancer

It’s important to remember that penis cancer is not the same as prostate cancer, though they do occur in the same general vicinity. Prostate cancer involves cancerous cells in the prostate. This requires very different treatment than cancer that occurs in penile tissue. The focus for this article is on penis cancer, so the signs of prostate cancer are not listed here.

A man might be suffering from penis cancer is he is dealing with any of the following symptoms:

1. Penis bumps or lumps, which will usually be large and painful

2. Redness or irritation of the penis that will not go away, no matter how good a man’s penis care regimen might be

3. Sores on the penis that have no clear cause and tend to have trouble healing

4. Bleeding from those sores on the penis

5. Strange discharge, either from the urethra or from the sores

Eagle-eyed guys will notice that several of these symptoms are also signs of some sexually transmitted diseases. The only way to know for sure what is going on with the penis is to visit a doctor and undergo testing for sexually transmitted diseases to rule those out. If there is no STD present, a man might be dealing with something more serious, including penis cancer.

Risk factors for penis cancer

Though cancer can strike anyone, there are some lifestyle choices and medical issues that can make a man more likely to wind up with penis cancer. These include the following:

1. Age – the older a man gets, the more likely he is to develop cancer. Those who are over the age of 60 are at greatest risk.

2. Some STDs – those who have contracted HPV are at higher risk

3. Uncircumcised – men who are intact are at higher risk, as are men who deal with a foreskin that is unable to retract properly

4. Smoking – those who use tobacco products are at greater risk for almost every health problem, including cancers

5. Personal hygiene – a man who doesn’t have the best hygiene is putting himself at greater risk of eventually developing.

6. Intimate life choices – a man who has several sexual partners is more likely to develop cancer than a guy who is more discerning.

7. Certain medical conditions – men who are dealing with various medical conditions, such as autoimmune issues, or those who have undergone certain treatments, might be at higher risk for developing.

What to do if penis cancer is a concern

If a man thinks he might be dealing with penis cancer, it’s time to visit the doctor. A physician can take a look at the problem, test for a variety of sexually transmitted diseases, rule out other medical conditions, and eventually get to the root of the problem. Visiting the doctor on a regular basis can also provide important peace of mind for a guy who worries about what might be going on with his equipment.

A man should also take the time to reach for a good penis health crème (health professionals recommend Man 1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin) every day. As an added protection against free radicals that can cause premature aging, the crème should contain alpha lipoic acid. A crème with a healthy dose of vitamin B5, A, D and C can also be helpful.

Does a Bent Penis Indicate Possible Cancer?

Few things make a man more nervous than the possibility of something seriously wrong with his penis – and things rarely get more serious than cancer. Where penis health is concerned, worry about cancer is way up there. Fortunately, penis cancer is rare, responsible for only about 1% of all cancer cases in men. But that doesn’t decrease its ability to strike fear in a man. And some men may have become especially concerned recently when articles began appearing that seem to link a bent penis to an increased likelihood of contracting cancer.

The study

These articles were largely based on a study published in the medical journal Fertility & Sterility. The data was first presented at the American Society for Reproductive Cancer Scientific Congress.

Entitled “Increased risk of cancer among men with Peyronie’s disease,” the study examined whether there was a clinical link between Peyronie’s disease and genetically-linked conditions, such as cancer. It was a retrospective cohort study, which means that it looked at existing data among a group of men and mined the data for information (as opposed to setting up a new test among a group or groups of people and seeing the results of this new test).

The study looked at more than 48,000 men with Peyronie’s disease, a condition in which a man experiences a severely bent penis rather than the simple curvature many men experience. In most cases, the severely bent penis is due to a build-up of fibrous scar tissue, or plaque, often from the penis having been traumatized by rough handling. The study also looked at more than 1,100,000 men with erectile dysfunction and at more than 480,000 “controls” who had neither a bent penis nor erectile issues.

The results

When the scientists sifted through the data, it indicated that men with Peyronie’s disease have a significantly increased risk for developing cancer, including penis cancer (specifically, a 40% greater risk).

Those results may seem alarming; several men reading this have probably already checked to see if their member is bent. But it’s important to remember that this study was looking at men with Peyronie’s disease, not at men whose penis curves a bit but not at such an angle as to be concerning.

And even for men who do indeed have a severely bent penis, there’s no cause to panic. In the first place, this is only one study; many more are needed to see if the conclusions it comes to are replicated in other studies. And while the study identifies a link, it may be more complicated than simply saying Peyronie’s increases cancer risk. And even if there is an increased risk, that in no way means a man with a bent penis is sure to get cancer.

That said, men with Peyronie’s disease may want to look at this study as a reminder to keep on top of their penis health. They may want to bring up this study with their doctor and ask if there is anything they can do to monitor for early signs of cancer.

A bent penis and its possible relationship to cancer is an outlier among penis health concerns. Everyday care of the organ can be aided by the regular application of a top notch penis health crème (health professionals recommend Man1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin). For best results, look closely at a crème’s ingredients and find one that includes L-carnitine. This amino acid is neuroprotective and can help restore the loss of sensitivity that may accompany a penis that has been handled too roughly. The best crème will also contain vitamin A, which is prized for its antibacterial properties and their ability to fight bacteria that can result in a persistent and unpleasant penis odor.